User:Jgdc47B/sandbox: Difference between revisions

From Deep web, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Line 20: Line 20:
 
Early in his career, Dury was assigned to special intelligence duties. One such was the detention in 1744 of the elderly and infirm Colonel William Cecil,<ref>{{cite thesis |last= Guite |first= Janetta Inglis Keith |date= September 1987|title= The Jacobite Cause, 1730-1740: The International Dimension |type= PhD |chapter= |publisher= McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario |url= https://macsphere.mcmaster.ca/handle/11375/15532 |access-date= 16 January 2020}}</ref> who had been gathering data on the numbers of Jacobite sympathisers in England who would rally to support [[Maurice de Saxe|Marshall Saxe]] in his invasion of England; he was sent to [[Tower of London|The Tower]].<ref name ="Whitworth" />
 
Early in his career, Dury was assigned to special intelligence duties. One such was the detention in 1744 of the elderly and infirm Colonel William Cecil,<ref>{{cite thesis |last= Guite |first= Janetta Inglis Keith |date= September 1987|title= The Jacobite Cause, 1730-1740: The International Dimension |type= PhD |chapter= |publisher= McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario |url= https://macsphere.mcmaster.ca/handle/11375/15532 |access-date= 16 January 2020}}</ref> who had been gathering data on the numbers of Jacobite sympathisers in England who would rally to support [[Maurice de Saxe|Marshall Saxe]] in his invasion of England; he was sent to [[Tower of London|The Tower]].<ref name ="Whitworth" />
   
During the [[Battle of Fontenoy]] in 1745 the [[Prince William, Duke of Cumberland|Duke of Cumberland]] was considerably annoyed by what he considered to be ill treatment of English wounded and prisoners by the French, in breach of the agreement on prisoners of war reached with [[Adrien Maurice de Noailles|Noailles]] some two years earlier. However Saxe argued that the English were already in breach of the agreement by confining at the Round Tower, [[Windsor Castle]] the prestigious [[Charles Louis Auguste Fouquet, duc de Belle-Isle|Marshal Belleisle]] and his brother, who had had been captured in the Electorate of Hanover. It was decided to free the Belleisle brothers , and Dury was immediately detailed to escort them back to France. He first took his distinguished charges to London, where incognito they were given a grand tour of England’s capital. Using a borrowed coach and six they were driven to Southwark, and carried in chairs into the heart of the city. The tour included [[Bank of England|The Bank]], the [[Royal Exchange, London|Royal Exchange]], the [[Mansion House, London|Mansion House]] and [[St Paul's Cathedral|St Paul’s]]. After returning to the [[Palace of Westminster]] and [[Westminster Abbey|the Abbey]], and then a good supper, they were taken to see the [[Swan Upping|Swan Uppers]] barges on the river. More sightseeing took place next day and, on the following morning, the Maréchal’s party was escorted out of London to Blackheath, and thence to Canterbury and Dover. The returning Maréchal was warmly welcomed in Calais, and Dury was given a gold hilted sword.<ref name ="Whitworth" />
+
His next big assignment came the following year. During the [[Battle of Fontenoy]] in 1745 the [[Prince William, Duke of Cumberland|Duke of Cumberland]] was considerably annoyed by what he considered to be ill treatment of English wounded and prisoners by the French, in breach of the agreement on prisoners of war reached with [[Adrien Maurice de Noailles|Noailles]] some two years earlier. However Saxe argued that the English were already in breach of the agreement by confining at the Round Tower, [[Windsor Castle]] the prestigious [[Charles Louis Auguste Fouquet, duc de Belle-Isle|Marshal Belleisle]] and his brother, who had had been captured in the Electorate of Hanover. It was decided to free the Belleisle brothers , and Dury was immediately detailed to escort them back to France. He first took his distinguished charges to London, where incognito they were given a grand tour of England’s capital. Using a borrowed coach and six they were driven to Southwark, and carried in chairs into the heart of the city. The tour included [[Bank of England|The Bank]], the [[Royal Exchange, London|Royal Exchange]], the [[Mansion House, London|Mansion House]] and [[St Paul's Cathedral|St Paul’s]]. After returning to the [[Palace of Westminster]] and [[Westminster Abbey|the Abbey]], and then a good supper, they were taken to see the [[Swan Upping|Swan Uppers]] barges on the river. More sightseeing took place next day and, on the following morning, the Maréchal’s party was escorted out of London to Blackheath, and thence to Canterbury and Dover. The returning Maréchal was warmly welcomed in Calais, and Dury was given a gold hilted sword.<ref name ="Whitworth" />
   
 
Dury took part in the [[Siege of Maastricht (1748)|siege of Maastricht in 1748]]. Ten years later he was given command of a brigade to take part in a raid on the northern French coast.<ref name ="Randall" /> Disaster struck at [[Saint-Cast-le-Guildo|St. Cast]] in Brittany on 11 September 1758. The British lost more than twice as many men as the French, as they fled back to their vessels. Alexander Dury was killed that day while trying to help his men get aboard.
 
Dury took part in the [[Siege of Maastricht (1748)|siege of Maastricht in 1748]]. Ten years later he was given command of a brigade to take part in a raid on the northern French coast.<ref name ="Randall" /> Disaster struck at [[Saint-Cast-le-Guildo|St. Cast]] in Brittany on 11 September 1758. The British lost more than twice as many men as the French, as they fled back to their vessels. Alexander Dury was killed that day while trying to help his men get aboard.

Revision as of 17:14, 16 January 2020

Alexander Dury (1704 – 1758) was born in Edinburgh on 10 December 1704, and christened the next day. He was son of the Huguenot immigrants Theodore Du Ry (born in France in 1661) and Mary-Anne Boulier De Beauregard. Although initially trained to be a minister he chose to make the army his career, rising to the rank of Major General in the First Regiment of Foot Guards. He was killed in Brittany at the age of 54.

Personal Life

Dury attended the Geneva Academy for four years, with Antoine Maurice (later professor of divinity) as his mentor.[1] The Academy was founded by Calvin and, at the time Dury was there, had the primary aim of training ministers.[2]

Dury had a liaison with Barbara Thompson from about 1746, and had two sons by her. He paid an allowance of some £40 a year from then on. The liaison was unknown to his wife, Isabella Turnor, whom he married at St. Mary Abbot's Church, Kensington on 24 July 1753. She learned of it in a letter received from Dury after his death, in which he requested her to continue payment of the allowance.[3]

Alexander and Isabella had two sons:

Alexander Dury's portrait[5] was painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds in 1758.[1] Dury wrote his will on 11 May 1758. After his death his extensive library was auctioned over a period of four days.

Military Career

Alexander Dury was commissioned into the First Regiment of Foot Guards on 24 June 1721.[3] He was appointed Second Major to the First Regiment of Foot Guards on 10 October, 1747;[6] Lieutenant-Colonel on 9 May 1749;[7] and Major General on 15 Feb 1757.[8]

Early in his career, Dury was assigned to special intelligence duties. One such was the detention in 1744 of the elderly and infirm Colonel William Cecil,[9] who had been gathering data on the numbers of Jacobite sympathisers in England who would rally to support Marshall Saxe in his invasion of England; he was sent to The Tower.[3]

His next big assignment came the following year. During the Battle of Fontenoy in 1745 the Duke of Cumberland was considerably annoyed by what he considered to be ill treatment of English wounded and prisoners by the French, in breach of the agreement on prisoners of war reached with Noailles some two years earlier. However Saxe argued that the English were already in breach of the agreement by confining at the Round Tower, Windsor Castle the prestigious Marshal Belleisle and his brother, who had had been captured in the Electorate of Hanover. It was decided to free the Belleisle brothers , and Dury was immediately detailed to escort them back to France. He first took his distinguished charges to London, where incognito they were given a grand tour of England’s capital. Using a borrowed coach and six they were driven to Southwark, and carried in chairs into the heart of the city. The tour included The Bank, the Royal Exchange, the Mansion House and St Paul’s. After returning to the Palace of Westminster and the Abbey, and then a good supper, they were taken to see the Swan Uppers barges on the river. More sightseeing took place next day and, on the following morning, the Maréchal’s party was escorted out of London to Blackheath, and thence to Canterbury and Dover. The returning Maréchal was warmly welcomed in Calais, and Dury was given a gold hilted sword.[3]

Dury took part in the siege of Maastricht in 1748. Ten years later he was given command of a brigade to take part in a raid on the northern French coast.[1] Disaster struck at St. Cast in Brittany on 11 September 1758. The British lost more than twice as many men as the French, as they fled back to their vessels. Alexander Dury was killed that day while trying to help his men get aboard.

References

  1. ^ a b c Randall, Elizabeth (2016), "The death of General Dury", The Huguenot Society Journal, The Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, 30 (4): 561=72
  2. ^ Heyd, Michael (1988). "The Geneva Academy in the Eighteenth Century". In Bender, Thomas (ed.). The University and the City: From Medieval Origins to the Present. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 79–91. ISBN 0-19-505273-0.
  3. ^ a b c d Whitworth, Rex (1993), "Major General Alexander Dury", Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research, Society for Army Historical Research, 71 (287): 146–153
  4. ^ "War-Office, May 23". The London Gazette (11876): 3. 23 May 1778.
  5. ^ "Major-General Alexander Dury, Lieut-Colonel, 1st Guards (c.1704-1758)". John Mitchell Fine Paintings. John Mitchel Fine Paintings Ltd. Retrieved 15 January 2020.
  6. ^ "Whitehall, December 15". The London Gazette (8701): 3. 15 December 1747.
  7. ^ "Whitehall, May 9". The London Gazette (8847): 1. 9 May 1749.
  8. ^ "Whitehall, February 15". The London Gazette (9661): 3. 15 May 1757.
  9. ^ Guite, Janetta Inglis Keith (September 1987). The Jacobite Cause, 1730-1740: The International Dimension (PhD). McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Retrieved 16 January 2020.