Arlington, Baltimore

From Deep web, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Arlington
neighborhood statistical area
Arlington is located in Baltimore
Arlington
Arlington
Coordinates: 39°20′53.42″N 76°40′55.96″W / 39.3481722°N 76.6822111°W / 39.3481722; -76.6822111Coordinates: 39°20′53.42″N 76°40′55.96″W / 39.3481722°N 76.6822111°W / 39.3481722; -76.6822111
CountryUnited States
StateMaryland
CityBaltimore
Area
 • Total.229 sq mi (0.59 km2)
 • Land.229 sq mi (0.59 km2)
 [1]
Population
 (2009)[1]
 • Total3,065
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
21215
Area code410, 443, and 667

Arlington is a neighborhood in Northwest Baltimore, Maryland. Major streets running through the area include Wabash Avenue, Rogers Avenue, Dolfield Avenue, and West Belvedere Avenue. Two Baltimore Metro Subway stations, Rogers Avenue and West Coldspring are located in the area.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Arlington, along nearby Pikesville, is home to a large Russian-American population.[2]

As of the late 1990s, Arlington was home to a population of 6,000 Russian-speaking Jews from Russia, Ukraine, and elsewhere in Eastern Europe.[3] By 2003, some 20,000 Jews of Russian origin lived in the Baltimore region, predominantly in Northwest Baltimore and nearby neighborhoods of Baltimore County.[4]

Notable residents[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Arlington include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Arlington neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland". City-data.com. Retrieved April 30, 2012.
  2. ^ "Foreign Immigration". Maryland Department of Planning. Archived from the original on 2016-03-03. Retrieved 2015-11-06.
  3. ^ "Suit alleges Russian doctor, pharmacy made arrangement to control business Health-Rite says Five Star took over prescriptions". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 2015-11-06.
  4. ^ Tanika White (October 5, 2003). "Rabbi ministers to new Russian immigrants' spiritual needs". The Baltimore Sun.
  5. ^ Carey, Benedict (July 21, 2009). "Sidney W. Bijou, Child Psychologist, Is Dead at 100". The New York Times. Retrieved July 22, 2009.

External links[edit]