Dirck Ten Broeck

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Dirck Ten Broeck
Dirck Ten Broeck.jpg
Speaker of the New York State Assembly
In office
1798–1800
Preceded byGulian Verplanck
Succeeded bySamuel Osgood
Member of the New York State Assembly
In office
1796–1802
Personal details
BornNovember 3, 1765
Albany, Province of New York, British America
DiedJanuary 30, 1833(1833-01-30) (aged 67)
North Castle, New York, U.S.
Political partyFederalist
Spouse(s)
Cornelia Stuyvesant
(m. 1785; died 1825)
ParentsAbraham Ten Broeck
Elizabeth Van Rensselaer
RelativesDirck Ten Broeck (grandfather)
Stephen Van Rensselaer I (grandfather)

Dirck Ten Broeck (November 3, 1765 – January 30, 1833)[1] was an American lawyer and politician. The first name is sometimes given as Derick.

Early life[edit]

He was the only son of Abraham Ten Broeck (1734–1810) and Elizabeth (née Van Rensselaer) Ten Broeck (1734–1813).[2] His twin sister died before her second birthday.[3] His father served as Mayor of Albany from 1779 to 1783, and again from 1796 to 1798. His younger sister, Elizabeth Ten Broeck (1772–1848), was married Rensselaer Schuyler (1773–1847), a son of Philip Schuyler and Catherine Van Rensselaer, making her a sister-in-law to Angelica Schuyler Church, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, Peggy Schuyler Van Rensselaer, and U.S. Representative Philip Jeremiah Schuyler.[4]

His maternal grandfather was Stephen Van Rensselaer I (the 7th Patroon and 4th Lord of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck) and his uncle was Stephen Van Rensselaer II.[5] His mother and uncle were great-grandchildren of the first native-born Mayor of New York City, Stephanus Van Cortlandt.[4] His paternal grandfather was Dirck Ten Broeck (1686–1751), who also served as Mayor of Albany from 1746 to 1748. His father's sister, his aunt Christina Ten Broeck (1718–1801) was married to Continental Congressman and signor of the Declaration of Independence Philip Livingston (1716–1778).[4]

Career[edit]

Ten Broeck was a Lieutenant colonel in the 1st Regiment of the City of Albany.[1]

He studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1791. He served on the Albany City Council in 1793.[6]

He was a Federalist member representing Albany in the New York State Assembly from 1796 to 1802, and was Speaker of the Assembly from 1798 to 1800 when John Jay was Governor of New York.[6]

Personal life[edit]

On September 6, 1785,[7] at the age of twenty, he married Cornelia Stuyvesant (d. 1825) at the New York City Dutch Church.[8] She was a daughter of Petrus Stuyvesant (1727–1805) and Margaret (née Livingston) Stuyvesant (1738–1818) and a sister of Peter Gerard Stuyvesant.[9] Her father was a great-grandson of Peter Stuyvesant, the last Dutch governor of New Netherlands.[10] For their wedding, he gave Cornelia a bracelet made by John Ramage featuring a watercolor painting of cupid.[7] Together, they had twelve children who were baptized in Albany and several more babies that were stillborn.[3] Their baptized children were:[6]

  • Abraham Stuyvesant Ten Broeck (1788–1810), who died unmarried.[6]
  • Margaret Stuyvesant Ten Broeck (1790–1873), who married Rev. Robert Gibson (1792–1829),[10] son of Robert Gibson of Charleston, S.C., on June 11, 1818.[6] Gibson founded the Edgehill School in Princeton.[11]
  • Petrus Stuyvesant Ten Broeck (1792–1849), a priest who married Lucretia Loring Cutter (1792–1861), daughter of Mayor Levi Cutter.[12]
  • Stephen Van Rensselaer Ten Broeck (1793–1793), who died young.[6]
  • Dirck Ten Broeck (1794–1794), who also died young.[6]
  • Elizabeth Maria Ten Broeck (1795–1795), who also died young.[6]
  • Cornelia Ten Broeck (1798–1798), who also died young.[6]
  • Dirck Wessels Ten Broeck (1800–1800), who also died young.[6]
  • Stephan Philip Van Rensselaer Ten Broeck (1802–1866), a physician who married Mary Nielson, daughter of William Nielson.[6]
  • Nicholas William Ten Broeck (1805–1805), who also died young.[6]
  • Elizabeth Ten Broeck (1810–1810), who also died young.[6]
  • Elizabeth Van Rensselaer Ten Broeck (1813–1813), who also died young.[6]

Ten Broeck died in North Castle in Westchester County, on January 30, 1833.[10][1]

Descendants[edit]

Through his daughter Margaret, he was the grandfather of Dr. Robert Phillips Gibson (1819–1890),[11] who married Susan Moser (1822–1902)[10] in 1845.[1] They were the parents of many children,[9][13] including Susan Meta Gibson, an artist,[14] and Henry Pierson Gibson (1856–1921),[10] who was buried at the Ten Broeck vault in St. Mark's Churchyard.[15]

Through his son Petrus, he was the grandfather of Cornelia Stuyvesant Ten Broeck (1820–1892)[16] who married George Edwin Bartol Jackson (1829–1891),[17] a lawyer from Portland, Maine.[18][19] on May 30, 1853.[20] They were the parents of Margaret Stuyvesant (née Jackson) White (1855-1939), Elizabeth Deblois (née Jackson) Merrill (1857-1933), Stuyvesant Ten Broeck Jackson (1860–1940).[20][21][22]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b c d Greene, Richard Henry; Stiles, Henry Reed; Dwight, Melatiah Everett; Morrison, George Austin; Mott, Hopper Striker; Totten, John Reynolds; Pitman, Harold Minot; Forest, Louis Effingham De; Ditmas, Charles Andrew; Mann, Conklin; Maynard, Arthur S. (1912). The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. New York Genealogical and Biographical Society. p. 92. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  2. ^ "Elizabeth Van Rensselaer (Mrs. Abraham) Ten Broeck (1734-1813)". www.albanyinstitute.org. Albany Institute of History & Art. Retrieved 12 September 2017.
  3. ^ a b Bielinski, Stefan. "Dirck Ten Broeck". exhibitions.nysm.nysed.gov. New York State Museum. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  4. ^ a b c Reynolds, Cuyler (1911). Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs: A Record of Achievements of the People of the Hudson and Mohawk Valleys in New York State, Included Within the Present Counties of Albany, Rensselaer, Washington, Saratoga, Montgomery, Fulton, Schenectady, Columbia and Greene. Lewis Historical Publishing Company. Retrieved 12 September 2017.
  5. ^ Bielinski, Stefan. "Elizabeth Van Rensselaer Ten Broeck". exhibitions.nysm.nysed.gov. New York State Museum. Retrieved 12 September 2017.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Runk, Emma Ten Broeck (1897). The Ten Broeck Genealogy, Being the Records and Annals of Dirck Wesselse Ten Broeck of Albany and his Descendants. New York: De Vinne press. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  7. ^ a b "Cupid Bracelet". www.albanyinstitute.org. Albany Institute of History and Art. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  8. ^ Bielinski, Stefan. "Cornelia Stuyvesant Ten Broeck". exhibitions.nysm.nysed.gov. New York State Museum. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  9. ^ a b Aitken, William Benford (1912). Distinguished Families in America, Descended from Wilhelmus Beekman and Jan Thomasse Van Dyke. Knickerbocker Press. p. 116. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  10. ^ a b c d e Saint Nicholas Society of the City of New York (1905). Genealogical Record. The Society. p. 65. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  11. ^ a b "Robert P. Gibson". The New York Times. 28 December 1890. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  12. ^ Batchelder, Calvin Redington (1876). A History of the Eastern Diocese. Claremont Manufacturing Company. p. 75. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  13. ^ Daughters of the American Revolution (1908). Lineage Book. The Society. p. 66. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  14. ^ Leonard, John William (1914). Woman's Who's Who of America: A Biographical Dictionary of Contemporary Women of the United States and Canada, 1914-1915. American Commonwealth Company. p. 324. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  15. ^ "DIED. Gibson". The New York Times. 4 November 1921. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  16. ^ Journal of the Sixty-Eighth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Maine. Portland, M.E.: W. H. Stevens & Co. | B. Thurston & Company. 1887. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  17. ^ Bowdoin College (1902). General Catalogue of Bowdoin College and the Medical School of Maine ... Bowdoin College. p. 79. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  18. ^ American Ancestry: Giving the Name and Descent, in the Male Line, of Americans Whose Ancestors Settled in the United States Previous to the Declaration of Independence A.D. 1776. Vol. III. Albany, N.Y.: Joel Munsell's Sons. 1888. p. 88. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  19. ^ The Poets of Maine: A Collection of Specimen Poems from Over Four Hundred Verse-makers of the Pine-tree State. Elwell, Pickard. 1888. p. 420. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  20. ^ a b College, Bowdoin (1895). Library Bulletin: Including the Obituary Record and the Reports of the Librarian. The Library. p. 93. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  21. ^ "Prof. George S. Jackson, 69, Of English Faculty at Maine". The New York Times. 3 February 1976. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  22. ^ "WEDDING IS HELD FOR MISS JACKSON; She Wears Gown of India Silk at Marriage in Stowe, Vt., to Robert W. Heussler". The New York Times. January 13, 1957. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
Sources
Political offices
Preceded by
Gulian Verplanck
Speaker of the New York State Assembly
1798–1800
Succeeded by
Samuel Osgood