Electoral history of Theodore Roosevelt

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Theodore Roosevelt in 1904.

Electoral history of Theodore Roosevelt, 26th President of the United States (1901–1909), 25th Vice President of the United States (1901) and 33rd Governor of New York (1899–1900)

Mayoral elections[edit]

New York City mayoral election, 1886[1][2][3][4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Abram Hewitt 90,552 41.23
Labor Henry George 68,110 31.01
Republican Theodore Roosevelt 60,435 27.52
Prohibition William T. Wardwell 532 0.24 %
Democratic gain from Nonpartisan

Gubernatorial elections[edit]

New York gubernatorial race, 1898 New York gubernatorial election, 1898

Vice presidential nomination=[edit]

Vice Presidential race, 1900 1900 Republican National Convention (Vice Presidential tally):

  • Theodore Roosevelt - 925 (99.89%)
  • Abstaining - 1 (0.11%)

1900 United States presidential election:

Presidential races, 1904-1916[edit]

1904 Republican National Convention (Presidential tally)

  • Theodore Roosevelt (inc.) - 994 (100.00%)

1904 United States presidential election:

1908 Republican National Convention (Presidential tally):

1911 New York Republican Senate caucus:

1912 Republican presidential primaries:

1912 Republican National Convention (Presidential tally):

1912 Progressive National Convention:

  • Theodore Roosevelt - unamiously

1912 United States presidential election:

1916 Progressive presidential primaries:

1916 Republican presidential primaries:

1916 Progressive National Convention:

  • Theodore Roosevelt - unamiously

1916 Republican National Convention:

1st ballot:

2nd ballot:

3rd ballot:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brookhiser, Richard (1993). "1886: The Men Who Would Be Mayor". City Journal. Retrieved 7 October 2019.
  2. ^ Sharp, Arthur G. (2011). The Everything Theodore Roosevelt Book: The Extraordinary Life of an American Icon. Adams Media. pp. 78–79. ISBN 9781440527296.
  3. ^ Taylor, Dorceta E. (23 November 2009). The Environment and the People in American Cities, 1600s-1900s: Disorder, Inequality, and Social Change. Duke University press. p. 572.
  4. ^ "RaceID=105179". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 6 October 2019.