Hudson River-Black River Regulating District

From Deep web, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Hudson River-Black River Regulating District
Flag of New York.svg
New York State public-benefit corporation overview
Formed1919 (1919)
JurisdictionUpper Hudson River watershed,
Black River watershed
HeadquartersHudson River Area Office
350 Northern Boulevard
Suite 307
Albany, NY 12204

Black River Area Office
317 Washington Street
Suite 612
Watertown, NY 13601
New York State public-benefit corporation executive
  • John C. Callaghan, Executive Director
Websitewww.hrbrrd.com

The Hudson River-Black River Regulating District (HRBRRD) is a New York state public-benefit corporation that traces its formation to the creation of the Black River Regulating District in 1919, and the Hudson River Regulating District in 1922 in response to the severe historical flooding of the cities of Albany, Green Island, Rensselaer, Troy, and Watervliet by the Sacandaga River and Hudson River and its tributaries. The HRBRRD, formed in 1959 by combining the two entities, collects excess runoff to reduce flooding impacts in the Hudson River and Black River basins, and releases this captured water gradually during periods of low river flow to maintain water quality in each river basin. This system was designed to reduce damage from spring storms and snowmelt, including disease and destruction of life and property, and to improve river navigation and public sanitation. The HRBRRD was also formed with hydroelectric generation in mind. It owns and operates several dams - including the Conklingville Dam which formed the Great Sacandaga Lake - and reservoirs.[1][2]

Organization[edit]

The HRBRRD is guided by a 7-member board. Its management team is headed by Executive Director John C. Callaghan, Sr.[3] In 2017, it had operating expenses of $8.53 million, no outstanding debt, and a staffing level of 24 people.[4]

For decades, HRBRRD's revenues came from lease agreements with electrical power companies who operate the hydroelectric generation facilities within the district, however these revenues ended in 2009 because of a lawsuit. The HRBRRD then tried to obtain revenue from the counties to which it provided flood relief, i.e., Warren, Washington, Saratoga, Rensselaer and Albany and a lawsuit was filed in response. The HRBRRD now receives revenue from Brookfield Renewable Power in the amount of $1.4 million per year (with an annual 3 percent increase), from permit fees charged to land owners along the shoreline of the Great Sacandaga Lake in the amount of $412,000 per year, and from dam maintenance fees received from the hydroelectric facilities in an annual amount of $471,000. After those three sources of revenue are accounted for, the remaining operating expenses and debt are paid for by the HRBRRD's benefiting county governments based upon assessed property value along the river system.[5]

Facilities[edit]

The HRBRRD owns and operates six dams and their accompanying reservoirs.[6] These facilities include:

The dams are inspected annually by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "HRBRRD Function Website". Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  2. ^ "HRBRRD Formation Website". Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  3. ^ "HRBRRD Corporate Website". Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  4. ^ "NYSAPO 2018 Report" (PDF). Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  5. ^ Jason Subik (May 19, 2018). "HRBRRD's Interim Director Plans for Future". The Daily Gazette. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  6. ^ Jason Subik (May 19, 2018). "HRBRRD's Interim Director Plans for Future". The Daily Gazette. Retrieved November 5, 2018.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]