Moradabad–Ambala line

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MoradabadAmbala line
Overview
StatusOperational
LocaleGangetic Plain in Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand and Haryana
TerminiMoradabad
Ambala
Operation
Opened1886
OwnerIndian Railway
Operator(s)Northern Railway
Technical
Track length274 km (170 mi)
Track gauge1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) broad gauge
Highest elevationMoradabad 201 m (659 ft)
Ambala Cantonment 272.530 m (894 ft)

The MoradabadAmbala line (also known as Moradabad - Ambala main line) is a railway line connecting Moradabad in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh and Ambala Cantonment in Haryana. The line is under the administrative jurisdiction of Northern Railway.

History[edit]

The Sind, Punjab and Delhi railway completed the 483-kilometre-long (300 mi) AmritsarAmbalaSaharanpurGhaziabad line in 1870 connecting Multan (now in Pakistan) with Delhi.

The Varanasi - Lucknow - Moradabad main line of Oudh and Rohilkhand Railway was extended to Saharanpur in 1886.[1]

Electrification[edit]

The Ambala - Saharanpur sector was electrified in 1996–98 and Saharanpur - Roorkee in 2003–04.[2] The Roorkee-Mordabad sector was electrified around 2005–06.[3]

The Ambala - Laksar - Moradabad sector is an electrified double-line.[4]

Sheds and workshops[edit]

Ambala has an outstation shed for Shakurbasti WDS-4 locos. Jagadhari has a carriage and wagon workshop and a bridge workshop.[5]

Speed limit[edit]

The Ambala - Moradabad - Lucknow - Pratapgarh - Mughalsarai line is classified as a "Group B" line and can take speeds up to 130 km/ h.[6]

Passenger movement[edit]

Moradabad and Ambala Cantonment on this line, are amongst the top hundred booking stations of Indian Railway.[7]

Railway reorganisation[edit]

Around 1872, the Indian Branch Railway Company was transformed into Oudh and Rohilkhand Railway.[8][9][10] Oudh and Rohilkhand Railway was merged with East Indian Railway Company in 1925.[11]

The Government of India took over the Bengal and North-Western Railway and merged it with the Rohilkhand and Kumaon Railway to form the Oudh and Tirhut Railway in 1943.[12]

In 1952, Eastern Railway, Northern Railway and North Eastern Railway were formed. Eastern Railway was formed with a portion of East Indian Railway Company, east of Mughalsarai and Bengal Nagpur Railway. Northern Railway was formed with a portion of East Indian Railway Company west of Mughalsarai, Jodhpur Railway, Bikaner Railway and Eastern Punjab Railway. North Eastern Railway was formed with Oudh and Tirhut Railway, Assam Railway and a portion of Bombay, Baroda and Central India Railway.[13] East Central Railway was created in 1996-97.[14] North Central Railway was formed in 2003.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Oudh and Rohilkhand Railway". Management Ebooks. Archived from the original on 11 January 2014. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  2. ^ "History of Electrification". IRFCA. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  3. ^ "Ambala-Jagadhri-Saharanpur-Moradabad" (PDF). Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  4. ^ "Indian Rail Day to Day". Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  5. ^ "Sheds and workshops". IRFCA. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  6. ^ "Chapter II – The Maintenance of Permanent Way". IRFCA. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  7. ^ "Indian Railways Passenger Reservation Enquiry". Availability in trains for Top 100 Booking Stations of Indian Railways. IRFCA. Archived from the original on 10 May 2014. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  8. ^ "IR History: Early History (1832-1869)". IRFCA. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  9. ^ "The Oudh and Rohilkhand Railway" (PDF). Old Martinian Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 June 2013. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  10. ^ "Indian Branch Railway". fibis. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  11. ^ "IR History III : (1900-1947)". IRFCA. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  12. ^ "Bengal and North-Western Railway". fibis. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  13. ^ "Geography – Railway Zones". IRFCA. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  14. ^ "East Central Railway". ECR. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  15. ^ "North Central Railway". NCR. Retrieved 25 January 2014.

External links[edit]