Samuel R. Callaway

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Samuel R. Callaway
BornDecember 24, 1850
DiedJune 1, 1904(1904-06-01) (aged 53)
Occupationrailroad executive

Samuel R. Callaway (December 24, 1850 – June 1, 1904) was an American railroad executive. He served as president of Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad and Belt Line, second vice president and general manager of Union Pacific Railroad 1884-1887, president of Toledo, St. Louis and Kansas City Railroad 1887-1895, president of Nickel Plate Road 1895-1897, president of Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad 1897-1898, president of New York Central Railroad 1898-1901 and as president of American Locomotive Company 1901-1904.[1][2][3][4]

Early life and family[edit]

Samuel R. Callaway was born in Ontario, Canada; sources differ on his birth date, some citing 1850,[2][5][6] others 1851.[7][8] He listed his birth date in the 1900 U.S. census as December 1850.[9] Samuel's parents, Frederick and Margaret Callaway, were of English and Scottish birth.[9][10]

On June 7, 1875, in Hamilton, Ontario, Samuel Callaway married Elizabeth J. "Jennie" Ecclestone, daughter of W.T. and Anna Ecclestone.[11] Together they had a daughter and two sons: Annie, Samuel Thompson. and Trowbridge.[9][10][12][13]

Career[edit]

Callaway began his railroad career in 1863 with the Grand Trunk Railway,[1][7] where he served as an apprentice to the treasurer, earning $8.33 per month.[7][8] He was promoted through several positions and in 1874 was appointed as superintendent of Detroit and Milwaukee Railroad; Callaway continued in this position until 1878 when he became superintendent of Detroit, Saginaw and Bay City Railroad.[8]

From 1887 to 1895, Callaway served as president and receiver of Toledo, St. Louis and Kansas City Railroad; under his leadership the railroad was reorganized and rebuilt. It was his work at this railroad that earned the attention of the Vanderbilt family and the New York Central system.[4]

Callaway succeeded D. W. Caldwell as president of the Nickel Plate Road in 1895.[14] It was about this time that Callaway was also offered the position of president for the Grand Trunk system he had recently left; he declined this position based on his feeling that he would not be allowed the autonomy that he wanted from the Grand Trunk's board of directors.[4] Callaway was succeeded as president of the Nickel Plate Road by W. H. Canniff in 1897.[14] Callaway then succeeded D. W. Caldwell as president of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad in 1897.[6][7]

On April 20, 1898, Callaway succeeded Chauncey Depew as president of New York Central Railroad.[6][8] At the time of Callaway's assumption of the presidency of New York Central, other significant leadership changes were made as well. Cornelius Vanderbilt retired from the chairmanship of the New York Central and the Michigan Central and William K. Vanderbilt retired from the chairmanship of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern and the Nickel Plate Road, although both continued as directors for these railroads after the change.[8]

When the American Locomotive Company (Alco) was formed through the merger of several smaller locomotive manufacturers in 1901, Callaway was selected to be the new company's first president.[5][6] The merger was widely not seen as positive by the public, so the directors chose Callaway hoping his reputation as a railroad leader would help with public opinion of the company.[4] Callaway was succeeded as president of Alco by Albert J. Pitkin.[15]

Death and legacy[edit]

Samuel R. Callaway died at his home in New York City on June 1, 1904, following an operation for mastoiditis.[2]

The village of Callaway, Nebraska, is named in his honor.[16][17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Testimony of Mr. Samuel R. Callaway, President New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company". Report of the Industrial Commission on Transportation. IV. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. October 8, 1899. pp. 217–239.
  2. ^ a b c "Samuel R. Callaway". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago. June 2, 1904. p. 9. Retrieved October 19, 2014.
  3. ^ "Samuel R. Callaway Out; Resigns the Presidency of the New York Central". New York Times. May 18, 1901. Retrieved October 19, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d Hannan, Caryn; Herman, Jennifer L.; Dye, Bryan; Ewald, Mel; Genel-Gonzalez, Gloria (1998). "Callaway, Samuel Rodger". Michigan Biographical Dictionary. I (2008-2009 ed.). St. Clair Shores, MI: Somerset Publishers, Inc. pp. 117–119. ISBN 0-403-09801-7.
  5. ^ a b "Samuel R. Callaway, President of the American Locomotive Company: A Biographical Sketch". Cassier's Magazine. XXI (6): 519–520. April 1902.
  6. ^ a b c d "Samuel R. Callaway". Railroad Men. XVII (10): 365 and 387. July 1904.
  7. ^ a b c d "Samuel R. Callaway: The New President of the Lake Shore Railway". Sacramento Daily Union. 93 (192). September 5, 1897. p. 8. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
  8. ^ a b c d e "The New York Central's New President". The Railway Agent and Station Agent. National Association of Railway Agents. XIX (2): 15–17. April 1898.
  9. ^ a b c 1900 U.S. census, Manhattan, New York, population schedule, ward 29, New York City, enumeration district (ED) 776, sheet 18-A, dwelling 219, family 313, Samuel R. Callaway household; digital images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11766-128383-31?cc=1325221 : accessed December 15, 2014).
  10. ^ a b 1880 U.S. census, Wayne County, Michigan, population schedule, Detroit, enumeration district (ED) 278, 49, dwelling 453, family 478, Samuel R. Callaway household; digital images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11085-93275-18?cc=1417683 : accessed December 15, 2014).
  11. ^ "Ontario Marriages, 1869-1927," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FMND-RZY : accessed 15 December 2014), Samuel R Callaway and Jennie E Ecclestone, 07 Jun 1875; citing registration 010287, Hamilton, Wentworth, Ontario, Canada, Archives of Ontario, Toronto; FHL microfilm 1,862,897.
  12. ^ "Michigan, Births, 1867-1902," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQ4R-P7D : accessed 15 December 2014), Samuel Calloway in entry for Samuel Calloway, 12 Apr 1880; citing item 1 p 397 rn 5252, Detroit, Wayne, Michigan, Department of Vital Records, Lansing; FHL microfilm 2,320,574.
  13. ^ (No author given), "(untitled)," Alumni Horae, St. Paul's School (http://archives.sps.edu/common/main.asp?Type=Article&ID=a_7819 : accessed December 15, 2014); digital image extract.
  14. ^ a b "Comparison of NKP Leadership Through the Years". Nickel Plate Road Historical & Technical Society, Inc. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
  15. ^ "The President of the American Locomotive Company". Railroad Men. XVII (10): 380. July 1904.
  16. ^ Gaster, Patricia C. (Fall 2009). "Locating Callaway". Nebraska History. Nebraska State Historical Society. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
  17. ^ Smith, Lorraine E. "Callaway, Custer County". Virtual Nebraska. University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
Business positions
Preceded by
President of Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad Succeeded by
Preceded by
President of Toledo, St. Louis and Kansas City Railroad
1887 – 1895
Succeeded by
Preceded by
D. W. Caldwell
President of Nickel Plate Road
1895 – 1897
Succeeded by
W. H. Canniff
Preceded by
D. W. Caldwell
President of Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad
1897 – 1898
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Chauncey Depew
President of New York Central Railroad
1898 – 1901
Succeeded by
New office President of American Locomotive Company
1901 – 1904
Succeeded by
Albert J. Pitkin