Trithemis

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Trithemis
Trithemis annulata.jpg
Trithemis annulata
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Odonata
Infraorder: Anisoptera
Family: Libellulidae
Genus: Trithemis
Brauer, 1868

Trithemis is a genus of dragonflies in the family Libellulidae. They are commonly known as dropwings. There are over 40 species, mainly from Africa; two are endemic to Madagascar, and five are endemic to Asia.[1] They are found in a wide variety of habitats; some species being adapted to permanent streams in forests, and others being capable of breeding in temporary pools in deserts.[2]

The genus contains the following species:[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Dijkstra, K.-D.B.; Clausnitzer, V. (2014). The dragonflies and damselflies of eastern Africa. Tervuren: Royal Museum for Central Africa. ISBN 978-94-916-1506-1.
  2. ^ Damm, S.; Dijkstra, K. D. B.; Hadrys, H. (2010). "Red drifters and dark residents: the phylogeny and ecology of a Plio-Pleistocene dragonfly radiation reflects Africa's changing environment (Odonata, Libellulidae, Trithemis)" (PDF). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 54 (3): 870–882. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2009.12.006. PMID 20004729. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  3. ^ Martin Schorr; Dennis Paulson. "World Odonata List". University of Puget Sound. Retrieved 12 October 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Samways, Michael J. (2008). The Dragonflies and Damselflies of South Africa. Pensoft. ISBN 954-642-330-0.
  5. ^ Clausnitzer, V. & Dijkstra, K.-D.B. (2010). "Trithemis africana". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2010: e.T169243A6596888. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2010-3.RLTS.T169243A6596888.en.
  6. ^ a b c "Checklist, English common names". DragonflyPix.com. Archived from the original on 4 December 2012. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  7. ^ Clausnitzer, V. (2006). "Trithemis annulata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2006. Retrieved 28 November 2010.
  8. ^ a b c Subramanian, K. A. (2005). Dragonflies and Damselflies of Peninsular India (PDF).
  9. ^ Clausnitzer, V.; Suhling, F. & Dijkstra, K.-D.B. (2009). "Trithemis dichroa". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2009. Retrieved 28 November 2010.
  10. ^ Clausnitzer, V.; Suhling, F. & Dijkstra, K.-D.B. (2009). "Trithemis grouti". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2009. Retrieved 28 November 2010.
  11. ^ Clausnitzer, V.; Suhling, F. & Dijkstra, K.-D.B. (2009). "Trithemis hecate". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2009. Retrieved 28 November 2010.
  12. ^ a b c Dijkstra, Klaas-Douwe B.; Kipping, Jens; Mézière, Nicolas (2015). "Sixty new dragonfly and damselfly species from Africa (Odonata)" (PDF). Odonatologica. 44 (4): 447–678. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  13. ^ Clausnitzer, V.; Suhling, F. & Dijkstra, K.-D.B. (2010). "Trithemis monardi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2010: e.T60063A12216622. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2010-3.RLTS.T60063A12216622.en.
  14. ^ Clausnitzer, V.; Suhling, F. & Dijkstra, K.-D.B. (2009). "Trithemis nuptialis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2009. Retrieved 28 November 2010.
  15. ^ Clausnitzer, V. & Suhling, F. (2009). "Trithemis pluvialis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2009. Retrieved 28 November 2010.