Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River

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Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River
Map showing the location of Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River
Map showing the location of Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River
LocationPennsylvania & New York, United States
Nearest cityHonesdale, PA
Coordinates41°38′24″N 75°03′31″W / 41.64008°N 75.05859°W / 41.64008; -75.05859Coordinates: 41°38′24″N 75°03′31″W / 41.64008°N 75.05859°W / 41.64008; -75.05859
Area55,575 acres (22,490 ha)-only about 30 acres (12 ha) are federally owned
Established1978 added to Wild and Scenic Rivers System
Visitors251,083 (in 2005)
Governing bodyNational Park Service
WebsiteUpper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River

The Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River is located near Narrowsburg, New York, and Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania, on the Delaware River. It includes parts of five counties along this section of the river: Delaware, Orange, and Sullivan in New York, and Pike and Wayne in Pennsylvania.

The site includes and protects Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct and the Zane Grey Museum. The Zane Grey Museum sustained significant damage due to the Eastern United States flooding of June 2006.[1]

The Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River stretches along approximately 73.4 miles (118.1 km) of the Delaware River from Hancock, New York, to Sparrowbush, New York. Most of the land in this unit of the National Park System is privately owned, the federal government owns only approximately 30 acres (12 ha). Within the park are the remains of the Delaware and Hudson Canal. This canal operated from 1828 to 1898 carrying anthracite coal and other regional products to the Hudson River where the products were shipped to various markets including New York City. The Delaware and Hudson Canal Company is considered one of the first private million dollar companies in the United States. Some of the remains of the canal are a National Historic Landmark.

Land Protection[edit]

More than 14,000 acres within the watershed of the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River are protected by conservation easements enacted by willing private property owners and held by the Delaware Highlands Conservancy land trust, which was founded by Barbara Yeaman in 1994.[2][3]

Activities[edit]

  • Recreation on the Delaware River – The shoreline of the river is mostly privately owned, but the waterway is open to public use, from numerous public access sites. Recreational opportunities include boating, fishing, and wildlife watching. While swimming is available, the river is swift and the rocks are slippery making it dangerous.[4]
  • Delaware and Hudson Canal – Between 1825 and 1829, the Delaware had Hudson Canal was a 108 miles (174 km) water route from the anthracite coal mines of Pennsylvania to the markets on the Hudson River. The U.S. Department of the Interior has designated the Delaware and Hudson Canal a National Historic Landmark and an NHL bronze plaque has been placed on the aqueduct. [5]
  • Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct - Believed to be the oldest suspension bridge in the United States, retaining its original elements.[6]
  • Zane Grey MuseumZane Grey (1872 – 1939) moved to Lackawaxen in 1905. From his home on the Upper Delaware, Zane began his writing career, becoming known as the “Father of the Western Novel”.[7]
  • Bird Watching – The Upper Delaware is a good location for Eagle watching. The clean running water provides food and the tall trees along the shoreline, offer perching and nesting sites. The river way is the largest wintering site of Bald Eagles in the northeast.[4] East of Pond Eddy a wheelchair accessible bird blind, Eagle Observation Area, along New York 97.
  • Hawk’s Nest - The Hawk's Nest is a scenic location outside Port Jervis, New York high above the Delaware River on New York State Route 97. Its name is derived from the birds of prey that nest in the area. The location is also known for its winding roads and scenic overlooks in the Delaware River Valley.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hauser Hahn, Carla (July 5, 2006). "Roebling Bridge Reopens to Vehicular Traffic". Nat'l Park Service. Retrieved 28 January 2015.
  2. ^ "A Living Legacy: Delaware Highlands Conservancy founder Barbara Yeaman". Our Country Home. Retrieved 2016-03-15.
  3. ^ "Barbara Yeaman: Legacy of a Lifetime - Conserveland". Conserveland. Retrieved 2016-03-15.
  4. ^ a b Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River, New York/Pennsylvania; National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior; Washington, D.C.; 2002
  5. ^ Upper Delaware, Delaware and Hudson Canal; Site Bulletin; National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior; Beach Lake, Pennsylvania: March 20, 2011
  6. ^ Upper Delaware, Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct; Site Bulletin; National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior; Beach Lake, Pennsylvania: March 20, 2011
  7. ^ Upper Delaware, Zane Grey Museum; Site Bulletin; National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior; Beach Lake, Pennsylvania; February 28, 2006

External links[edit]